How Does a Blood Tracking Light Work?

If you are a bow shooter or a firearm hunter, whatever your skill level be, you are likely to have experienced some difficult times tracking a wounded animal at night. But with a blood tracking light, finding your hunt can be an easy task.

The problem with finding animals after you shoot them is that they run in a clumsy manner as they’re hurt and bleeding and will try to hide anywhere. You may think that since they’re near, it should be easy to find them? But no. It’s not.

As the animal can go about 100 feets away and disappear within seconds, you cannot do much with a regular light here. But with a simple blood tracking light, you can easily follow the blood trail. This process would be a hassle without the device.

Some Ideas on UV Ray Lighting

Many people think that it is the UV rays that illuminates the blood. It’s not completely true. Although in the past, UV rays have been used heavily to track down hunted animals by following their blood trails, they have some downsides.

UV Ray Lighting

UV rays will only work when the blood is hot and fresh, otherwise they don’t reflect light well. Also, if you spray the trailing path with a chemical spray then the rays can work but spraying and powdering is another hassle which is not so ideal.

For experienced hunters who can follow the animal fast in the shortest time possible, UV lights can be a good thing. But since you’re interested to know about blood tracking lights, let’s talk about them.

How Blood Tracking Lights Work?

As using UV lights is not ideal for hunting for several reasons such as shooting or hitting with a bow will not immediately guarantee a kill and the animal can run off quite hundreds of feets aways, something that can light up the blood later is needed.

This is where a blood tracking light comes into play. Among all the other ideas of finding a hunted animal, this one is the best. Using coleman gas to track blood is great too but that comes with a risk of forest fires, so not a good idea to go for it.

How Blood Tracking Lights Work

These days blood trackers are made with high powered LED lights. LEDs don’t use so much power nor make much heat and still they can be very bright and durable at the same time. White, blue, and red are the most common LED colors.

Depending on the LED color, the blood can be made more striking on the forest floor or glow very bright. Each color absorbs other colors in different ways and gives an advantage. Let’s see which color might be good for you -

What Color Light is the Best for a Blood Tracking Light?

Every color has its own advantages and disadvantages. Let’s briefly discuss about three major colors -

White - White is the brightest and illuminates blood the most. This is simply above all the others and will create the highest contrast. It’s highly effective and most popular among hunters. White color will not scare the animals.

Red - Red is easy on eyes and will help you distinguish blood easily. Although this is less bright than the other colors and creates less contrast, it’ll not scare other animals as the color will match with the surrounding well.

Blue - The problem with blue is that it tends to scare all the animals away. It’s not very bright but will create a good contrast for you to notice the blood well. However, night vision will not work well while using blue light.

LED or Incandescent

LED lights are insanely popular because of their larger color spectrum and ability to show colors that wouldn’t be easily possible with the incandescent lights. But some people like to use blue filters on top of incandescent lights to get long range lights.

Whether you choose LEDs or Incandescent, it’s up to you. But if you prefer higher spectrum and the ability to see colors sharp, you have to go for LEDs.

Extro

Hopefully now you have some ideas on how blood tracking lights work. Which color or light type you want to go for it’s your choice but try to get something with a warm and clean color, it’ll be easy on your eyes at night.

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